Texas couples who decide to call it quits find that the process can be much more complicated if children are involved. Not only are there practical things to work out such as child support and child custody, but the emotional welfare of the children must be at the top of the priority list. Fortunately if parents handle the process the right way, the American Psychological Association states that children can adjust well within the first two years after the split. On the opposite side, children who are raised in high-conflict marriages may have more problems. Contrary to popular belief, there are times when splitting from an unhappy marriage is better for the children than staying together at all costs. 

KidsHealth lists some of the most important things that parents can do to protect kids during a divorce. First, any heated discussions, conflict and legal talk should be done in private and away from little listening ears. Second, there should be minimal interruption to the child’s regular daily routine if possible. Third, keep any blame and negativity in conversations with those outside the home or in therapy sessions rather than letting them out when the children are present. Finally, each parent should remain involved in the kids’ lives throughout the entire process. 

Parents and adults often need help and support to get through a split or divorce. This help and support can come from family, clergy, professionals and friends. One place the support should never come from is the children. Kids should not be required to bear that burden for their parents while they deal with their own emotions. 

Parenting under pressure quickly becomes the norm during and after a divorce. This pressure can be minimized if parents are patient with the kids and themselves, they get help in sorting through their own feelings and they recognize the triggers and signs of stress. 

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